Monday, July 21, 2014

Targeted Cyber Attacks Review



Not only does this book show you how hackers and others commit cyber-attacks, but how to secure your system to protect it from these cyber-attacks.
Do you wonder why anyone would want to commit a cyber-attack? Quoted directly from the book, in chapter one:
          The exploitation of networks and technologies for gathering  information  is now commonplace on the Internet, and targeted cyber attacks
are a common weapon for subverting the integrity of Internet operations.
These attacks steal intellectual property, conduct cyber espionage,
damage critical infrastructure and create uncertainty among
users. They can achieve both tactical and strategic goals across the
Internet without requiring any physical encroachment. It is clear that
targeted attacks provide a tactical advantage that can play a significant
role in future cyber wars.” (Sood and Enbody 2014)
With so much at stake, you would think that more people would seek to learn more about these attacks in order to protect themselves. In the case of commerce, it would also protect their end users. Is your online shopping or even your email accounts safe? What about your online banking? There are so many questions and sometimes too few answers. Yet, there are people like Sood and Enbody among others, who have the answers. As long as we take the time to listen, read and learn. No books in the world will be of any value if we refuse to take the time to read, learn and follow the suggestions the authors give us.


1.      Targeted Cyber Attacks Sood & Enbody 2014



Monday, June 9, 2014

Real-Time Communication with WebRTC Review



Are you curious how real time communications work? This includes services such as VOIP. RTC is a standard that now allows you to use peer-to-peer architecture to communicate in real time. HTML5 now allows you to view audio and video in real time. Think of all the multimedia applications you can now build and use without proprietary plugins.

WebRTC uses telecommunications and web development to produce workable applications. It is about time we came up with this, so we can make the web a more interesting place to visit.

If you look at the TOC, or table of contents, you can see how fully this book covers the subject of WebRTC. If you have ever wondered how this works and what you can do with it, this is the book for you. I find it fascinating reading. I have included the table of contents so you can actually see how fully this subject is covered. There are examples of the work and you can a download link is provided in the book. Chapter 5 helps you to put it all together so you can see how it actually works. I have to admit that I don’t understand some of what is covered in the book, but it still remains a very interesting read. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn about WebRTC.


Preface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
1. Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Web Architecture 1
WebRTC Architecture 2
WebRTC in the Browser 3
Signaling 5
WebRTC API 5
MediaStream 6
PeerConnection 7
DataChannel 8
A Simple Example 9
2. Handling Media in the Browser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
WebRTC in 10 Steps 11
Media Capture and Streams 12
MediaStream API 12
Obtaining Local Multimedia Content 13
URL 13
Playing with the getUserMedia() API 13
The Media Model 19
Media Constraints 19
Using Constraints 19
3. Building the Browser RTC Trapezoid: A Local Perspective. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Using PeerConnection Objects Locally: An Example 27
Starting the Application 32
Placing a Call 36
Hanging Up 44
Adding a DataChannel to a Local PeerConnection 46
Starting Up the Application 51
Streaming Text Across the Data Channel 57
Closing the Application 60
4. The Need for a Signaling Channel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Building Up a Simple Call Flow 63
Creating the Signaling Channel 72
Joining the Signaling Channel 76
Starting a Server-Mediated Conversation 79
Continuing to Chat Across the Channel 82
Closing the Signaling Channel 85
5. Putting It All Together: Your First WebRTC System from Scratch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
A Complete WebRTC Call Flow 91
Initiator Joining the Channel 104
Joiner Joining the Channel 110
Initiator Starting Negotiation 112
Joiner Managing Initiator’s Offer 115
ICE Candidate Exchanging 117
Joiner’s Answer 121
Going Peer-to-Peer! 123
Using the Data Channel 125
A Quick Look at the Chrome WebRTC Internals Tool 129
6. An Introduction to WebRTC API’s Advanced Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Conferencing 133
Identity and Authentication 134
Peer-to-Peer DTMF 135
Statistics Model 136
A. WebRTC 1.0 APIs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . 139


 

Monday, May 19, 2014

Head First JavaScript Programming Review



I like the Head First series of books because they help you to think outside the box. Everyone has his or her own way of thinking and learning, which is good, but you need to learn how you think in order to think effectively, especially when learning to program. If you ‘don’t get it, then you’ll forget it.’ I find this to be very true. When I try to read something that is written in a dry manner I have so much trouble remembering the material, regardless of how much I need to learn the subject. On the other hand, if it’s written in a conversational, engaging style, then I remember it so much easier.
They all have exercises to do and the authors tell you that, yes you do need to do the exercises. I believe it is important to do the exercises because that is how many others and I learn, by being hands on. Imagine learning how to be an auto mechanic without ever touching an automobile.
This is the second Head First book I’ve chosen to review and I’ve had as much fun with this one as the last one. I at first was irritated that I had to use a browser for this book, until I thought about the fact that JavaScript is undoubtedly one reason there are so many neat things on the web to see and even amuse us.
There are thirteen chapters in this book that covers a host of things we need to learn in order to program in JavaScript, as well as an appendix that covers ‘ten things we didn’t cover’, so you know about things you can learn to go even further with JavaScript.
I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in learning JavaScript.



About Me

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Nina Slone has worked at many types of jobs; currently she is selling eBooks on her website. She likes to paint, draw and sketch. Her favorite tools are charcoal, pencil and oil paint. She loves modern or smooth jazz and many other genres of music. Mother Earth Beat, David Sanborn, David Arkenstone, CCR, Bob Seger, John Fogerty, David Allen Coe, etc. She loves the mountains as well as the ocean. She also believes that we are all connected, and have a Divine Spirit in each of us.

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